Discussion:
How does a super-nova explosion sound ???
(too old to reply)
Tristan Beeline
2005-06-15 02:20:59 UTC
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I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.

What can I do now?
Richard Crowley
2005-06-15 02:38:43 UTC
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"Tristan Beeline" wrote ...
Post by Tristan Beeline
I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.
What can I do now?
MOS
Jay Rose CAS
2005-06-15 02:46:23 UTC
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Post by Tristan Beeline
I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.
It doesn't. Vacuum.

So, um, have a blast.
--
Correct address is spell out the letter j, AT dplaydahtcom
Clio- and Emmy-winning sound design
Learn audio for video at www.dplay.com
Richard Crowley
2005-06-15 03:45:43 UTC
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"Jay Rose CAS" wrote...
Post by Jay Rose CAS
Post by Tristan Beeline
I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.
It doesn't. Vacuum.
So, um, have a blast.
Well, if you are close enough (a few thousand miles?), you might
detect some slight momentary increase in pressure as the remains
of the "blast wave" passes your location. But likely sub-sonic
and maybe detectable only with a barometer rather than a mic.
m***@soundtq.co.nz
2005-06-15 04:07:48 UTC
Permalink
Try Sound Rangers.com

They have a very good site

mike
www.mikewestgatesound.co.nz
Adam Dransfield
2005-06-15 04:39:42 UTC
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However this may be closely followed by death.
Post by Richard Crowley
Well, if you are close enough (a few thousand miles?), you might
detect some slight momentary increase in pressure as the remains
of the "blast wave" passes your location. But likely sub-sonic
and maybe detectable only with a barometer rather than a mic.
Jason Porter
2005-06-15 12:40:20 UTC
Permalink
well, if you were mixing it at Skywalker Sound...it would probably consist
of-

4 cows mooing
3 seals barking
2 producers screaming
and 1 tie-fighter!
...followed by various passes with flangers , phasers, and delays.

:)

-Jason
g***@yahoo.com
2005-06-15 04:16:00 UTC
Permalink
Would that be like a souped up Nova, say a '66 with a big block V8. I
know exactly what that sounds like!


Gerry Formicola

Chicago, Illinois
"John Blankenship, CAS" <"John Blankenship, CAS">
2005-06-15 08:27:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tristan Beeline
I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.
What can I do now?
Road trip!

Hang a hard left at the edge of the Milky Way.


John Blankenship, C.A.S.
Indianapolis
(email: my initials at mw daht net)


Henry Padilla
2005-06-15 12:27:20 UTC
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Post by Tristan Beeline
I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.
What can I do now?
Technically, the others are right, it doesn't sound like anything.
BUT... What I would find effective is... Camera at a few thousand miles
(suns are big, you really don't want to be that close anyway), no sound at
the moment of the explosion. Then as the blast wave comes at you (at
several thousand miles a second) this low rumbling gets louder...and
louder...and louder! Until a final pop as it passes your point in space and
a cut to a reaction shot.

But that's me.
Tom P.
Ty Ford
2005-06-15 13:21:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tristan Beeline
I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.
What can I do now?
Hire a sound designer.

Ty Ford



-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
m***@yahoo.com
2005-06-15 14:24:43 UTC
Permalink
I think it would be cool to take a realistic approach (for once) and
have no sound, just visuals. Remember how effective the exterior space
shots were in 2001 when Hal killed off the first astronaut. No sound.
It was chilling.
"John Blankenship, CAS" <"John Blankenship, CAS">
2005-06-15 16:55:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@yahoo.com
I think it would be cool to take a realistic approach (for once) and
have no sound, just visuals. Remember how effective the exterior space
shots were in 2001 when Hal killed off the first astronaut. No sound.
It was chilling.
I can hear Bruckheimer's cries now: "More noise! More flames! More
noise! More flames! Bigger! Bigger!"

John Blankenship, C.A.S.
Indianapolis
(email: my initials at mw daht net)


s***@soundbreeder.com
2005-06-16 06:48:14 UTC
Permalink
Use a hydrophone, that what we use at our school for supernovas.

S.
Post by Tristan Beeline
I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.
What can I do now?
Richard Crowley
2005-06-16 14:33:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@soundbreeder.com
Post by Tristan Beeline
I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.
What can I do now?
stuart wrote ...
Post by s***@soundbreeder.com
Use a hydrophone, that what we use at our school for supernovas.
Doesn't explode in a total vacuum, does it? :-)
d***@coffeysound.com
2005-06-16 18:01:29 UTC
Permalink
I like the idea of no sound. That's what made 2001 so effective.

However, if you do need to add sound design, I would use a lot of
waterfall, earthquake, and other rumble and fire.

Of course, since nobody has ever actually heard a supernova, you do
whatever you want. I like the idea of cows mooing.....and maybe some
low level flattulance.

-Dave
Richard Crowley
2005-06-17 03:05:59 UTC
Permalink
Dave Coffey wrote ...
Post by d***@coffeysound.com
Of course, since nobody has ever actually heard a supernova,
you do whatever you want. I like the idea of cows mooing.....
and maybe some low level flattulance.
In Canon Beach, Oregon, the tsunami warning system is tested
each Monday at noon by playing a track of cows mooing. Quite
as effective as the real warning sound, but not likely to be
mistaken for an actual alert.

Only the new tourists find it disorienting to hear cow sounds
from the sky in "downtown" Canon Beach. :-)
Jay Rose CAS
2005-06-17 17:13:11 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
***@coffeysound.com wrote:
...
Post by d***@coffeysound.com
Of course, since nobody has ever actually heard a supernova, you do
whatever you want. I like the idea of cows mooing.....and maybe some
low level flattulance.
And cat-in-heat. I recorded mine in 1972, and have used it on a lot of stuff.
--
Correct address is spell out the letter j, AT dplaydahtcom
Clio- and Emmy-winning sound design
Learn audio for video at www.dplay.com
Sergio Sanmiguel (Sound Sorcerer)
2005-06-18 04:58:19 UTC
Permalink
I say may sound like a farting Cow from outer space spinning into a
390-mph tornado on top of a volcano eruption, mixed up backwards with
the sound a vacuum cleaner sucking water from a plastic cup.
SS
Damifiknow
2005-06-19 17:33:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tristan Beeline
I want to create a movie with lots of exploding suns, but I don't know
how a supernova does sound.
What can I do now?
1: Ask the folks at JPL to make a really long shotgun mic. (Light Years
Long)

2: The only sound they make is radio noise

3: Have someone foley a good approximation of the visual (which by the
way is probably a visual interpretation of the above mentioned "Radio
Noise").

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